I just feel like no matter what, prisons are bad for everybody. They aren’t just bad for trans people—they’re bad for all people. It wouldn’t be fair for me to make it seem like it was so hard for me, just as a trans women, because I’ve been around a lot of people who don’t deserve to be in prison at all. Prison is hard for everybody. We’ve all got our personal issues and have to do what we need to do to survive in there and be strong.

It’s not the right approach for people to sensationalize this story and say: You were a trans woman in a men’s prison. Because at the end of the day, all prisons are bad for all people—trans, cys, gay, straight, Black, white, Asian, brown, purple, polka-dotted, striped, zebra, alien or whatever.

Yes, I had my issues. I dealt with extra discrimination and extra scrutiny. I had to deal with things that other people wouldn’t have had to deal with in prison because I was a trans woman in a men’s prison. Of course, it was upsetting, and it was hard.

But I was blessed to have the support of a team that was willing to support me in this fight against the system. Not everyone in there had that—not everyone had support or someone to help them or be there for them, to protect them or understand them or get them in touch with the right resources. I was blessed to have that.

So yes, I can say how hard it was for me, but what about the people in prison who are there wrongfully or for petty charges or because of the criminalization of everything? There are men and women who have been in there for days, years, even decades—what about them?

janetmock:

reclaimingthelatinatag:

Trailer for the documentary film TransVisible: Bamby Salcedo’s Story

From the film’s official website:

TransVisible: Bamby Salcedo’s Story is a documentary film on the life of renowned Trans Latina activist and leader, Bamby Salcedo. Turning personal challenges and barriers into the basis of her activism, Bamby has become an effective and beloved advocate and role model for multiple communities including the Trans, Latina, immigrant, youth, and LGBT communities. 

Websites for her affiliated organizations:

www.translatinacoalition.org

www.angelsofchange.net.

Learn more about the movie, including screenings, here

Everything. 

queeraztlan:

janetmock:

Inspired by the release of Lovemme Corazón’s memoir, I decided to write this post on my blog, answering, “Why don’t we have more books by trans women of color?”

Lovemme and Janet are flipping your world over.

I hope everyone realizes how important this article is. Lovemme’s memoir was the first TWoC memoir I knew existed. I honestly thought it might be the only published book by a trans woman of color.

girljanitor:

this is some seriously powerful stuff from Janet Mock!!!

mocosyamores:

For your glitter sex parties. For your ability to self-identity. For you to be femme trans men. For you to have GAY RIGHTS!!!! and to even have national conversations about ~marriage equality~ as shitty as they both are. We died to give you life, a voice, a fucking megaphone and stand so you could shout every fucking crime committed against your body/psyche/soul/family. We died to live as freely and proudly and as unapologetically as we could. We were murdered and tortured and imprisoned and ridiculed and dehumanized and marginalized and pushed out of the VERY ORGANIZATIONS WE CREATED SO YOU COULD HAVE YOUR ~PRIDE~. YOUR VISIBILITY. YOUR QUEER SPACES. YOUR FUCKING LIBERATION.

Pay us some damn fucking respect and realize that the least you can do is give up some of your space so we don’t have to fucking fight our way to see the stage where our trans sisters aren’t even performing.

queersex:


unapproachableblackchicks:




Unless you’ve been following the work of Monica Roberts, The Opposing Views and David Lohr over atThe Huffington Post, you probably don’t know that a trans teenage girl from Charlottesville, Va., has been missing for nearly 20 days.
Since Sage Smith was first reported missing on Nov. 22, there has been virtually no mainstream media coverage of her abduction. There has only been one local story produced, and in it reporters consistently use the wrong pronouns to identify her, and the story only mentions the name she lives by once, as though it were a nickname. Even worse, the local authorities who are spearheading the search for her have reportedly lost their suspect without much hope of finding her.
….




The failure to show LGBTQ people of color as active and vital members of our communities and families perpetuates the dangerous stereotype that LGBTQ people of color are either nonexistent or that our identities are invalid. The media has failed to shine light on the targeted violence that trans women of color continue to endure. According to the National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs, 40 percent of anti-LGBT murder victims in 2011 were transgender women; there have been 11 reported murders of trans women in the U.S. this year alone. The media have also failed to contextualize that violence alongside the discrimination that trans women of color face as a result of racism, misogyny and transphobia, and most Americans are unaware of these severe disparities in access and opportunity. Were any of these things factors in Sage’s disappearance? We don’t know. But by ignoring her story, the media are further alienating an already marginalized community and identity. We’ve seen this story before. Remember Mitrice Richardson? She was a 24-year-old African-American lesbian woman who was missing for nearly a year before police uncovered her dead body.


Praying for her safe return.
xX KCB xX


Breaks my heart


Sage has been missing since Nov. 22nd - it’s been over a month now.
you can find more information on how to support the efforts to bring Sage home safely here

queersex:

unapproachableblackchicks:

Unless you’ve been following the work of Monica RobertsThe Opposing Views and David Lohr over atThe Huffington Post, you probably don’t know that a trans teenage girl from Charlottesville, Va., has been missing for nearly 20 days.

Since Sage Smith was first reported missing on Nov. 22, there has been virtually no mainstream media coverage of her abduction. There has only been one local story produced, and in it reporters consistently use the wrong pronouns to identify her, and the story only mentions the name she lives by once, as though it were a nickname. Even worse, the local authorities who are spearheading the search for her have reportedly lost their suspect without much hope of finding her.

….

The failure to show LGBTQ people of color as active and vital members of our communities and families perpetuates the dangerous stereotype that LGBTQ people of color are either nonexistent or that our identities are invalid. The media has failed to shine light on the targeted violence that trans women of color continue to endure. According to the National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs, 40 percent of anti-LGBT murder victims in 2011 were transgender women; there have been 11 reported murders of trans women in the U.S. this year alone. The media have also failed to contextualize that violence alongside the discrimination that trans women of color face as a result of racism, misogyny and transphobia, and most Americans are unaware of these severe disparities in access and opportunity. Were any of these things factors in Sage’s disappearance? We don’t know. But by ignoring her story, the media are further alienating an already marginalized community and identity. We’ve seen this story before. Remember Mitrice Richardson? She was a 24-year-old African-American lesbian woman who was missing for nearly a year before police uncovered her dead body.

Praying for her safe return.

xX KCB xX

Breaks my heart

Sage has been missing since Nov. 22nd - it’s been over a month now.

you can find more information on how to support the efforts to bring Sage home safely here

girl-germs:

The Sojourner’s Church in Charlottesville is heading up fundraising efforts for the search for Sage. She has been missing for a month and a half, and there hasn’t been a huge effort because of lack of money. I know times are tight for everyone right now, but please donate what you can! They’ve only raised $50 so far. Tumblr please, please, this one time, work your magic. Reblog this far and wide!

kararikue:

55 - La Revolucionaria
Revolutions are often started by those who have little left to lose.
On the night of the Stonewall Riots, Sylvia Rivera — an orphaned, homeless, trans* /gender-variant woman and sex worker of Venezuelan and Puerto Rican descent - was a few days shy of 18. But none of that stopped her from revolting when a group of cops raided the Stonewall Inn.
Despite raids being a common occurrence at the time, Sylvia and her friend Marsha P. Johnson decided that enough was enough. They began to throw bottles at the police, and with the help of other queer people tired of police oppression, ultimately barricaded the invading officers inside the bar.
Her act of defiance sparked a movement towards queer liberation, and to this day we are indebted to her.

kararikue:

55 - La Revolucionaria

Revolutions are often started by those who have little left to lose.

On the night of the Stonewall Riots, Sylvia Rivera — an orphaned, homeless, trans* /gender-variant woman and sex worker of Venezuelan and Puerto Rican descent - was a few days shy of 18. But none of that stopped her from revolting when a group of cops raided the Stonewall Inn.

Despite raids being a common occurrence at the time, Sylvia and her friend Marsha P. Johnson decided that enough was enough. They began to throw bottles at the police, and with the help of other queer people tired of police oppression, ultimately barricaded the invading officers inside the bar.

Her act of defiance sparked a movement towards queer liberation, and to this day we are indebted to her.

[photo: to the right is an image of Janet Mock and to the left is a quote of hers that reads, “every time there’s a trans woman of color [in the media], she’s getting killed. It wrecks at our souls. It chips away. And then SRLP says, “let’s see what we can do about this.” there is a link to donate to the Sylvia Rivera Law Project. www.indiegogo.com/srlp10]
janetmock:

Standing by the Sylvia Rivera Law Project means standing at the intersection of low-income communities and trans folks. Help fun SRLP’s next 10 years of life-changing work. 
READ MORE
GIVE EVEN MORE

[photo: to the right is an image of Janet Mock and to the left is a quote of hers that reads, “every time there’s a trans woman of color [in the media], she’s getting killed. It wrecks at our souls. It chips away. And then SRLP says, “let’s see what we can do about this.” there is a link to donate to the Sylvia Rivera Law Project. www.indiegogo.com/srlp10]

janetmock:

Standing by the Sylvia Rivera Law Project means standing at the intersection of low-income communities and trans folks. Help fun SRLP’s next 10 years of life-changing work. 

READ MORE

GIVE EVEN MORE

unapproachableblackchicks:


Unless you’ve been following the work of Monica Roberts, The Opposing Views and David Lohr over atThe Huffington Post, you probably don’t know that a trans teenage girl from Charlottesville, Va., has been missing for nearly 20 days.
Since Sage Smith was first reported missing on Nov. 22, there has been virtually no mainstream media coverage of her abduction. There has only been one local story produced, and in it reporters consistently use the wrong pronouns to identify her, and the story only mentions the name she lives by once, as though it were a nickname. Even worse, the local authorities who are spearheading the search for her have reportedly lost their suspect without much hope of finding her.
….


The failure to show LGBTQ people of color as active and vital members of our communities and families perpetuates the dangerous stereotype that LGBTQ people of color are either nonexistent or that our identities are invalid. The media has failed to shine light on the targeted violence that trans women of color continue to endure. According to the National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs, 40 percent of anti-LGBT murder victims in 2011 were transgender women; there have been 11 reported murders of trans women in the U.S. this year alone. The media have also failed to contextualize that violence alongside the discrimination that trans women of color face as a result of racism, misogyny and transphobia, and most Americans are unaware of these severe disparities in access and opportunity. Were any of these things factors in Sage’s disappearance? We don’t know. But by ignoring her story, the media are further alienating an already marginalized community and identity. We’ve seen this story before. Remember Mitrice Richardson? She was a 24-year-old African-American lesbian woman who was missing for nearly a year before police uncovered her dead body.

Praying for her safe return.
xX KCB xX

unapproachableblackchicks:

Unless you’ve been following the work of Monica RobertsThe Opposing Views and David Lohr over atThe Huffington Post, you probably don’t know that a trans teenage girl from Charlottesville, Va., has been missing for nearly 20 days.

Since Sage Smith was first reported missing on Nov. 22, there has been virtually no mainstream media coverage of her abduction. There has only been one local story produced, and in it reporters consistently use the wrong pronouns to identify her, and the story only mentions the name she lives by once, as though it were a nickname. Even worse, the local authorities who are spearheading the search for her have reportedly lost their suspect without much hope of finding her.

….

The failure to show LGBTQ people of color as active and vital members of our communities and families perpetuates the dangerous stereotype that LGBTQ people of color are either nonexistent or that our identities are invalid. The media has failed to shine light on the targeted violence that trans women of color continue to endure. According to the National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs, 40 percent of anti-LGBT murder victims in 2011 were transgender women; there have been 11 reported murders of trans women in the U.S. this year alone. The media have also failed to contextualize that violence alongside the discrimination that trans women of color face as a result of racism, misogyny and transphobia, and most Americans are unaware of these severe disparities in access and opportunity. Were any of these things factors in Sage’s disappearance? We don’t know. But by ignoring her story, the media are further alienating an already marginalized community and identity. We’ve seen this story before. Remember Mitrice Richardson? She was a 24-year-old African-American lesbian woman who was missing for nearly a year before police uncovered her dead body.

Praying for her safe return.

xX KCB xX

tranqualizer:

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

New York City: Marsha P. Johnson and Sylvia Rivera, veterans of the Stonewall Rebellion and founders of STAR (Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries), march in the 1973 Pride Parade.

<3_<3

tranqualizer:

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

New York City: Marsha P. Johnson and Sylvia Rivera, veterans of the Stonewall Rebellion and founders of STAR (Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries), march in the 1973 Pride Parade.

<3_<3

queerkhmer:

Shout out to the homeless queers youths, jailed trans women, queer people of color struggling with intersecting oppression, and poor rural queer kids who survive homophobic abuse from their communities while Katy Perry gets recognition for their struggles. 

[photo: image of graffiti on a brick wall. in a rectangular frame, the bottom right of the art is of CeCe McDonald, a trans woman of color who is currently incarcerated for fighting back against anti-trans and racist violence. CeCe is smiling. her hair is black and her face, body, and clothing are purple. behind her are white and golden rays. there is text reads, &#8220;free CeCe&#8221;.]
leslie-feinberg:

‘Free CeCe!’courtesy of the artist:Millán G. Figueroa   see more of Millán’s art at:   corazondecondor.comPaintings by the artist honoring CeCe McDonald, Brandy Martell, and Gwen Araujo are currently hanging up at the SOMArts gallery.caption information from Millán G. Figueroa:“FREE CECE! spray-paint stencil, 30X24.”location photo image:Albany Bulb, Albany, California, U.S.date photo made: August 29, 2012++++Between now and trial I am posting a photo a day to FREE CECE NOW![for information about CeCe McDonald’s struggle, explore: supportcece.wordpress.com]Thank you to the photographers/artists/activistswho are contributing photo/s to an onlineSLIDE SHOW DEDICATION to FREE CECE McDONALD—entitled “This is what solidarity looks like!”The dedication will be part of the May Day 2013free online publication of the 20th-anniversaryauthor edition of Stone Butch BluesPlease make your own individual and group photosin support of CeCe’s struggle for the slide showtitled “This is what solidarity looks like!”FREE CECE NOW!!Photo information/photo credit forms:Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/notes/leslie-feinberg-on-facebook/stone-butch-blues-multi-media-digital-dedication-to-free-cece-mcdonald/486837591335592Tumblr:http://leslie-feinberg.tumblr.com/IACenter.org:http://iacenter.org/lgbt/cecemcdonaldpictures/

[photo: image of graffiti on a brick wall. in a rectangular frame, the bottom right of the art is of CeCe McDonald, a trans woman of color who is currently incarcerated for fighting back against anti-trans and racist violence. CeCe is smiling. her hair is black and her face, body, and clothing are purple. behind her are white and golden rays. there is text reads, “free CeCe”.]

leslie-feinberg:

‘Free CeCe!’

courtesy of the artist:
Millán G. Figueroa
   see more of Millán’s art at:
   corazondecondor.com
Paintings by the artist honoring CeCe McDonald, Brandy Martell, and Gwen Araujo are currently hanging up at the SOMArts gallery.

caption information
from Millán G. Figueroa:
“FREE CECE! spray-paint stencil, 30X24.”

location photo image:
Albany Bulb, Albany, California, U.S.
date photo made: August 29, 2012

++++

Between now and trial I am posting
a photo a day to FREE CECE NOW!
[for information about CeCe McDonald’s struggle,
explore: supportcece.wordpress.com]

Thank you to the photographers/artists/activists
who are contributing photo/s to an online
SLIDE SHOW DEDICATION to FREE CECE McDONALD—
entitled “This is what solidarity looks like!”

The dedication will be part of the May Day 2013
free online publication of the 20th-anniversary
author edition of Stone Butch Blues

Please make your own individual and group photos
in support of CeCe’s struggle for the slide show
titled “This is what solidarity looks like!”

FREE CECE NOW!!

Photo information/photo credit forms:

Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/notes/leslie-feinberg-on-facebook/stone-butch-blues-multi-media-digital-dedication-to-free-cece-mcdonald/486837591335592

Tumblr:http://leslie-feinberg.tumblr.com/

IACenter.org:http://iacenter.org/lgbt/cecemcdonaldpictures/


The second annual Philly Trans March Oct. 6 was dedicated to Kyra (Kruz) Cordova, a 27-year-old Philadelphia transgender woman who was active in the Gay and Lesbian Latino AIDS Education Initiative. Cordova was found shot in the head on Sept. 3. A $25,000 reward has been offered for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the person responsible for her murder. Several family members also spoke about the unsolved murder of Stacey Blahnik, a 31-year-old African-American trans woman murdered in 2010. [SOURCE]

The second annual Philly Trans March Oct. 6 was dedicated to Kyra (Kruz) Cordova, a 27-year-old Philadelphia transgender woman who was active in the Gay and Lesbian Latino AIDS Education Initiative. Cordova was found shot in the head on Sept. 3. A $25,000 reward has been offered for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the person responsible for her murder. Several family members also spoke about the unsolved murder of Stacey Blahnik, a 31-year-old African-American trans woman murdered in 2010. [SOURCE]

atriptothemorg:

tal9000:

Fixed the link (btw the author is on tumblr)

I totes am! Follow me, if you like what you read.