kararikue:

55 - La Revolucionaria
Revolutions are often started by those who have little left to lose.
On the night of the Stonewall Riots, Rivera — an orphaned, homeless, trans* /gender-variant woman, sex worker of Venezuelan and Puerto Rican descent - was a few days shy of 18. But none of that stopped her from revolting when a group of cops raided the Stonewall Inn.
Despite raids being a common occurrence at the time, Sylvia and her friend Marsha P. Johnson decided that enough was enough. They began to throw bottles at the police, and with the help of other queer people tired of police oppression, ultimately barricaded the invading officers inside the bar.
Her act of defiance sparked a movement towards queer liberation, and to this day we are indebted to her.

kararikue:

55 - La Revolucionaria

Revolutions are often started by those who have little left to lose.

On the night of the Stonewall Riots, Rivera — an orphaned, homeless, trans* /gender-variant woman, sex worker of Venezuelan and Puerto Rican descent - was a few days shy of 18. But none of that stopped her from revolting when a group of cops raided the Stonewall Inn.

Despite raids being a common occurrence at the time, Sylvia and her friend Marsha P. Johnson decided that enough was enough. They began to throw bottles at the police, and with the help of other queer people tired of police oppression, ultimately barricaded the invading officers inside the bar.

Her act of defiance sparked a movement towards queer liberation, and to this day we are indebted to her.

mocosyamores:

For your glitter sex parties. For your ability to self-identity. For you to be femme trans men. For you to have GAY RIGHTS!!!! and to even have national conversations about ~marriage equality~ as shitty as they both are. We died to give you life, a voice, a fucking megaphone and stand so you could shout every fucking crime committed against your body/psyche/soul/family. We died to live as freely and proudly and as unapologetically as we could. We were murdered and tortured and imprisoned and ridiculed and dehumanized and marginalized and pushed out of the VERY ORGANIZATIONS WE CREATED SO YOU COULD HAVE YOUR ~PRIDE~. YOUR VISIBILITY. YOUR QUEER SPACES. YOUR FUCKING LIBERATION.

Pay us some damn fucking respect and realize that the least you can do is give up some of your space so we don’t have to fucking fight our way to see the stage where our trans sisters aren’t even performing.

fyqueerlatinxs:

thespiritwas:

“We (Lesbian Feminist Liberation) found out there were plans to have a transvestite as part of the entertainment for the 1973 Gay Pride rally in Washington Square following the march and we decided to make a statement critical of transvestites…we decided we were going to stand up on that stage and tell everybody what we thought.  We stayed up the whole night before the rally and typed up this little statement.  We thought it was very important.  You see, we were creating theory at the time.” Jean O’Leary, founder of Lesbian Feminist Liberation, later the first president of the National Gay & Lesbian Task Force (NGLTF)

“The transgender community was silenced because of a radical lesbian named Jean O’Leary, who felt that the transgender community was offensive to women because we liked to wear makeup and we liked to wear miniskirts.  Excuse me! It goes with the business that we’re in at the time! Because people fail to realize that -not trying to get off the story -everybody thinks that we want to be out on them street corners.  No we do not.  We don’t want to be out there sucking dick and getting fucked in the ass.  But that’s the only alternative that we have to survive because the laws do not give us the right to go and get a job the way we feel comfortable.  I do not want to go to work looking like a man when I know I am not a man” Sylvia Rivera

A case could be made that we should have included transvestites rights but I don’t think that gay people wanted to be identified with that.  We were trying to get away from that image.  And we were trying to get the bill passed.  So the transvestites were excluded from the bill and they never got reinstated.” Jean O’Leary

“I thought free loving was the thing, I found it doesn’t pay the rent…During the daytime they all call us fags and freaks.  At night I get even.  I freak on them.  I make them pay for all the insults they gave me.  I can have a nice conversation with them, give them words of wisdom.  But I’m getting back at them. My way.” Marsha P Johnson


Many of you guap@s may be heading out to Atlanta this week to partake in the Creating Change conference.

We can’t ask you not to go. However, remember the oppressive history of our community.

When you are in Atlanta, look around and ask yourself (and everyone in charge) where Sylvia and Marsha are? Where are their daughters, sons, and children? Because change isn’t possible if we do not center it on the most marginalized.

Women in GLF [the Gay Liberation Front, an organization Rivera co-founded] were uncomfortable referring to [Sylvia] Rivera – who insisted on using women’s bathrooms, even in City Hall – as “she.” The pressure mounted. The year 1973 witnessed a clash that would take Rivera out of the movement for the next two decades. As her lifelong friend and fellow Stonewall veteran Bob Kohler recalled, “Sylvia left the movement because after the first three or four years, she was denied a right to speak.”

The breaking point came during the Pride rally in Washington Square Park after the 1973 Christopher Street Liberation Day march. To the dismay of Lesbian Feminist Front (LFL), drag queens were scheduled to perform. As LFL passed out flyers outlining their opposition to the “female impersonators,” Rivera wrestled for the microphone held by emcee Vito Russo, before getting hit with it herself. Rivera later explained, “I had to battle my way up on stage, and literally get beaten up and punched around by people I thought were my comrades, to get to that microphone. I got to the microphone and said my piece.” Rivera complained that the middle-class crowd cared little to nothing about the continued harassment and arrest of street drag queens. Bleeding, Rivera screamed, “Revolution Now!” and lend the crowd in a chant of “Give me a G, Give me an A, Give me a Y … What does that spell?” Barely audible, her voice breaking, she groaned, “GAY POWER.” Russo later recalled that only the sudden appearance of Bette Midler averted outright violence, as trans opponents and supporters battled over the mike. Midler, having listened to what was happening on the radio in her Greenwich Village apartment, rushed to the scene, wrested control of the mike, and started singing “Friends.” Rivera would not return to formal queer organizing for some two decades.

Benjamin Shepard, “Sylvia and Sylvia’s Children: The Battle for a Queer Public Space,” That’s Revolting! (ed. Matt Bernstein Sycamore)

here is video footage of Sylvia Rivera on that day 

'y'all better quiet down'

trigger warning for content regarding violence, rape. 

http://vimeo.com/45479858#at=0

kararikue:

55 - La Revolucionaria
Revolutions are often started by those who have little left to lose.
On the night of the Stonewall Riots, Sylvia Rivera — an orphaned, homeless, trans* /gender-variant woman and sex worker of Venezuelan and Puerto Rican descent - was a few days shy of 18. But none of that stopped her from revolting when a group of cops raided the Stonewall Inn.
Despite raids being a common occurrence at the time, Sylvia and her friend Marsha P. Johnson decided that enough was enough. They began to throw bottles at the police, and with the help of other queer people tired of police oppression, ultimately barricaded the invading officers inside the bar.
Her act of defiance sparked a movement towards queer liberation, and to this day we are indebted to her.

kararikue:

55 - La Revolucionaria

Revolutions are often started by those who have little left to lose.

On the night of the Stonewall Riots, Sylvia Rivera — an orphaned, homeless, trans* /gender-variant woman and sex worker of Venezuelan and Puerto Rican descent - was a few days shy of 18. But none of that stopped her from revolting when a group of cops raided the Stonewall Inn.

Despite raids being a common occurrence at the time, Sylvia and her friend Marsha P. Johnson decided that enough was enough. They began to throw bottles at the police, and with the help of other queer people tired of police oppression, ultimately barricaded the invading officers inside the bar.

Her act of defiance sparked a movement towards queer liberation, and to this day we are indebted to her.

moosemother:

New stencil - Sylvia Rivera. FIN.

moosemother:

New stencil - Sylvia Rivera. FIN.

tranqualizer:

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

New York City: Marsha P. Johnson and Sylvia Rivera, veterans of the Stonewall Rebellion and founders of STAR (Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries), march in the 1973 Pride Parade.

<3_<3

tranqualizer:

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

New York City: Marsha P. Johnson and Sylvia Rivera, veterans of the Stonewall Rebellion and founders of STAR (Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries), march in the 1973 Pride Parade.

<3_<3

trigger warning: mention of nature of Marsha&#8217;s death
weallcount:

Marsha P. Johnson, transgender gay rights activist (1944 – 1992)
Little known (or recognized) in the Stonewall Rebellion that launched gay liberation, was the role of Marsha P. Johnson and Sylvia Rivera. These two transgender activists were on the leading edge of the rebellion, battling the police, and coining the term “Whose Streets, Our Streets!”
Marsha co-founded STAR (Street Transvestite/Transgender Action Revolutionaries) with Sylvia Rivera, to help aid, feed and shelter queer/trans people without homes and those who’d runaway.
Marsha was found floating in the Hudson River shortly after the 1992 Pride March; the police declined to investigate and ruled her death suicide. Marsha P. Johnson remains a legendary figure in the fight for queer liberation as part of the struggle for racial and economic justice.

trigger warning: mention of nature of Marsha&#8217;s death

trigger warning: mention of nature of Marsha’s death

weallcount:

Marsha P. Johnson, transgender gay rights activist (1944 – 1992)

Little known (or recognized) in the Stonewall Rebellion that launched gay liberation, was the role of Marsha P. Johnson and Sylvia Rivera. These two transgender activists were on the leading edge of the rebellion, battling the police, and coining the term “Whose Streets, Our Streets!”

Marsha co-founded STAR (Street Transvestite/Transgender Action Revolutionaries) with Sylvia Rivera, to help aid, feed and shelter queer/trans people without homes and those who’d runaway.

Marsha was found floating in the Hudson River shortly after the 1992 Pride March; the police declined to investigate and ruled her death suicide. Marsha P. Johnson remains a legendary figure in the fight for queer liberation as part of the struggle for racial and economic justice.

trigger warning: mention of nature of Marsha’s death


Sylvia Rae Rivera (2 July 1951 – 19 February 2002) was an American transgender activist. Rivera was a founding member of both the Gay Liberation Front and the Gay Activists Alliance and helped found STAR (Street Transgender Action Revolutionaries), a group dedicated to helping homeless young street trans women, with her friend Marsha P. Johnson. (wiki)

Sylvia Rae Rivera (2 July 1951 – 19 February 2002) was an American transgender activist. Rivera was a founding member of both the Gay Liberation Front and the Gay Activists Alliance and helped found STAR (Street Transgender Action Revolutionaries), a group dedicated to helping homeless young street trans women, with her friend Marsha P. Johnson. (wiki)

hmelt:

Sylvia Rivera speaking @ the 1973 Christopher Street Liberation Day Rally

trigger warning: discussion of sexual assault

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

New York City: Marsha P. Johnson and Sylvia Rivera, veterans of the Stonewall Rebellion and founders of STAR (Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries), march in the 1973 Pride Parade.

&lt;3_&lt;3

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

New York City: Marsha P. Johnson and Sylvia Rivera, veterans of the Stonewall Rebellion and founders of STAR (Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries), march in the 1973 Pride Parade.

<3_<3

thegang:

Portrait of Sylvia Rivera (1951-2002) posing in front of her altar to Marsha P. Johnson (1944-1992), by Valerie Shaff, ca. 2000
In the early 1970’s Sylvia Rivera and Marsha P. Johnson co-founded S.T.A.R., Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries, an organization designed to achieve rights for her community, and provide social services to this largely ignored and stigmatized group. For a short while she and Marsha P. Johnson ran S.T.A.R. House which provided shelter for homeless young street queens. Lack of funds and problems with the certificate of occupancy for S.T.A.R. House, forced the abandonment of the venture at that time, but Rivera never lost the dream of creating a supportive and safe living space for young transgender people.
Rivera was greatly disillusioned with the desire of many early gay and lesbian activists to distance the gay movement from transvestites, drag queens, and other gender variant people, in spite of the fact that these people were often the “shock troops” for the entire gay community.
The Sylvia Rivera Law Project notes,
A veteran of the 1969 Stonewall uprising, Sylvia was a tireless advocate for all those who have been marginalized as the “gay rights” movement has mainstreamed. Sylvia fought hard against the exclusion of transgender people from the Sexual Orientation Non-Discrimination Act in New York, and was a loud and persistent voice for the rights of people of color and low-income queers and trans people.
(via afrodiaspores)

thegang:

Portrait of Sylvia Rivera (1951-2002) posing in front of her altar to Marsha P. Johnson (1944-1992), by Valerie Shaff, ca. 2000

In the early 1970’s Sylvia Rivera and Marsha P. Johnson co-founded S.T.A.R., Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries, an organization designed to achieve rights for her community, and provide social services to this largely ignored and stigmatized group. For a short while she and Marsha P. Johnson ran S.T.A.R. House which provided shelter for homeless young street queens. Lack of funds and problems with the certificate of occupancy for S.T.A.R. House, forced the abandonment of the venture at that time, but Rivera never lost the dream of creating a supportive and safe living space for young transgender people.

Rivera was greatly disillusioned with the desire of many early gay and lesbian activists to distance the gay movement from transvestites, drag queens, and other gender variant people, in spite of the fact that these people were often the “shock troops” for the entire gay community.

The Sylvia Rivera Law Project notes,

A veteran of the 1969 Stonewall uprising, Sylvia was a tireless advocate for all those who have been marginalized as the “gay rights” movement has mainstreamed. Sylvia fought hard against the exclusion of transgender people from the Sexual Orientation Non-Discrimination Act in New York, and was a loud and persistent voice for the rights of people of color and low-income queers and trans people.

(via afrodiaspores)