[image description: a silly photo of Selena Garcia sticking her tongue out at the camera. a quote from her reads, “yes, it’s hard being in here. but i’m gonna make it. i believe in us. jail isn’t gonna slow me down nor stop me. they think it’s gonna break me but i’m still going on… in here i am no longer selina marie garcia. i am #34! not a human being, but a caged animal with the number 148902 on my head.” additional text reads, “selina garcia has been incarcerated for 3 weeks for allegedly breaking wake county student code of conduct. DSS won’t pick her up from jail. tell the cops, the courts, and the schools to free her NOW to a home in Raleigh, where she can graduate at Southeast Raleigh High with her friends!” that are hashtags that reads, “not number 34” and “bring selina home.”]
SIGN THIS PETITION TO BRING 17-YEAR-OLD SELINA GARCIA HOME
On March 7, 2014 Selina Garcia, a senior at Southeast Raleigh high school was suspended from school because of allegations that she committed level II infractions. Her administrator suspended her for 5 days, noting mitigating factors including prolonged and explicit harassment by the other student involved in the incident. However, the School Resource Officer, which are employed by Raleigh Police Department, decided that this wasn’t enough – said that she needed to “learn a lesson,” and so he arrested her and took her to jail. Despite the fact that she posed NO safety threat to the school environment, the officer made the conscious choice to criminalize her. He didn’t care that she wanted to focus on graduating this Spring, and needed to be in school to accomplish that goal – all that mattered was asserting his dominance and “teaching her a lesson” 
When the SRO arrested her, he likely thought that she would go to jail for a couple hours and then be picked up by her family.  But, 19 days later and counting, there’s no end in sight for her.
SIGN THIS PETITION TO BRING 17-YEAR-OLD SELINA GARCIA HOME
please click thru to sign the petition and read more on the demands Selina and her community are making.

[image description: a silly photo of Selena Garcia sticking her tongue out at the camera. a quote from her reads, “yes, it’s hard being in here. but i’m gonna make it. i believe in us. jail isn’t gonna slow me down nor stop me. they think it’s gonna break me but i’m still going on… in here i am no longer selina marie garcia. i am #34! not a human being, but a caged animal with the number 148902 on my head.” additional text reads, “selina garcia has been incarcerated for 3 weeks for allegedly breaking wake county student code of conduct. DSS won’t pick her up from jail. tell the cops, the courts, and the schools to free her NOW to a home in Raleigh, where she can graduate at Southeast Raleigh High with her friends!” that are hashtags that reads, “not number 34” and “bring selina home.”]

SIGN THIS PETITION TO BRING 17-YEAR-OLD SELINA GARCIA HOME

On March 7, 2014 Selina Garcia, a senior at Southeast Raleigh high school was suspended from school because of allegations that she committed level II infractions. Her administrator suspended her for 5 days, noting mitigating factors including prolonged and explicit harassment by the other student involved in the incident. However, the School Resource Officer, which are employed by Raleigh Police Department, decided that this wasn’t enough – said that she needed to “learn a lesson,” and so he arrested her and took her to jail. Despite the fact that she posed NO safety threat to the school environment, the officer made the conscious choice to criminalize her. He didn’t care that she wanted to focus on graduating this Spring, and needed to be in school to accomplish that goal – all that mattered was asserting his dominance and “teaching her a lesson” 

When the SRO arrested her, he likely thought that she would go to jail for a couple hours and then be picked up by her family.  But, 19 days later and counting, there’s no end in sight for her.

SIGN THIS PETITION TO BRING 17-YEAR-OLD SELINA GARCIA HOME

please click thru to sign the petition and read more on the demands Selina and her community are making.

THE CRISIS: Wake County’s public school students are in a state of emergency. In the 2011-2012 school year there were over 14,000 suspensions.  disadvantaged students (i.e., students receiving free or reduced lunch) are 63% of suspensions but only 33% of student population. Black students make up 25% of the student population, but receive 60% of suspensions. 

We demand Wake County achieve its stated mission to “significantly increase achievement for all students by providing a world-class education that equips students with the knowledge and expertise to become successful, productive citizens” by placing a Moratorium or temporary pause on Out-Of-School-Suspensions while planning and implementing restorative justice programs including:

  • Investing in hiring counselors, and not school resource officers. The National Association of School Psychologists’ recommended ratio of students per school counselor is 600, but the Wake County ratio is well over 1,600 students per counselor. (ACS Report.)
  • Hiring Student Support Teams. Only 20% of students served by Student Support Teams in Wake County are in middle or high school. We need to expand the capacity of student support teams and prioritize their presence in high schools and middle schools.
  • Training students, staff, and volunteers in transformative justice practices such as peace circles and peer mediation.
TRIGGER WARNING: police brutality, abuse of power, police harassment of a child.
firstladysexyfineass:

hiphopandinsubordination:

thirdeyeblinking:

datingdisastersofaqueergirl:

kemetically-afrolatino:

NYPD Cops handcuff and interrogate Bronx boy, 7, for 10hours over missing $5




“Reyes was handcuffed and verbally, physically and emotionally abused, intimidated, humiliated, embarrassed and defamed,” the documents say. He was then charged with robbery.
“My son was crying, ‘Mommy, it wasn’t me! Mommy, it wasn’t me!’ I never imagined the cops could do that to a child. We’re traumatized,” Wilson Reyes’ distraught mom, Frances Mendez told The Post last night.
“Imagine how I felt seeing my son in handcuffs!’’ she said. “It was horrible. I couldn’t believe what I was seeing.”






it’s a racist police state in The Bronx, raising kids to be criminals.
school-to-prison pipeline is in full effect #thenewjimcrow



SEVEN FUCKING YEARS OLD
ACAB doesn’t even come close. 

HE IS A BABY 

HE’S A FUCKING CHILD. The fuck, yo?

WHAT THE FUCK

oh jesus fuck
TRIGGER WARNING: police brutality, abuse of power, police harassment of a child.

TRIGGER WARNING: police brutality, abuse of power, police harassment of a child.

firstladysexyfineass:

hiphopandinsubordination:

thirdeyeblinking:

datingdisastersofaqueergirl:

kemetically-afrolatino:

NYPD Cops handcuff and interrogate Bronx boy, 7, for 10hours over missing $5

“Reyes was handcuffed and verbally, physically and emotionally abused, intimidated, humiliated, embarrassed and defamed,” the documents say. He was then charged with robbery.

“My son was crying, ‘Mommy, it wasn’t me! Mommy, it wasn’t me!’ I never imagined the cops could do that to a child. We’re traumatized,” Wilson Reyes’ distraught mom, Frances Mendez told The Post last night.

“Imagine how I felt seeing my son in handcuffs!’’ she said. “It was horrible. I couldn’t believe what I was seeing.”

it’s a racist police state in The Bronx, raising kids to be criminals.

school-to-prison pipeline is in full effect #thenewjimcrow

SEVEN FUCKING YEARS OLD

ACAB doesn’t even come close. 

HE IS A BABY 

HE’S A FUCKING CHILD. The fuck, yo?

WHAT THE FUCK

oh jesus fuck

TRIGGER WARNING: police brutality, abuse of power, police harassment of a child.

l
oldenough2burmom:

And in Pennsylvania, the governor is preparing to release the names of 40 Philadelphia public schools waiting for closure. At the same time, he is escalating prison construction to accommodate the expected inmate population from today’s children. His calculus is based on income and minority status — meaning that he’s closing schools for poor children but building them prisons.
approachingsignificance:

11 Stunning Facts About America’s Prisons
In 2009 there were 7.2 million people in prison and under official supervision like probation — a larger population than the state of Washington
Between 1987 and 2007 the national prison population tripled.
4 in 10 prisoners return to state prisons within three years of release.
One in 30 men between 20 and 34 is behind bars — and up to one in 13 in one state.
One in nine black men between 20 and 34 are behind bars.
734 out of every 100,000 people are behind bars in the U.S. — far and away the highest number in the world.
The United States is the world’s largest jailer. Russia and South Africa are the closest, but the rates drop dramatically after that.
Part of the bizarre prison black market, a thimbleful of tobacco can fetch up to $50 at a maximum security prison.
Typically parole programs cost taxpayers $7.47 per day per parolee, while prisons cost $78.95 per day per inmate nationwide.
Some prisoners cost more. It costs New Jersey $253 million every year to house just its death row prisoners — $11 million apiece.
Between 1987 and 2007 state prison costs rose by 315 percent to $44.06 billion a year.

l

oldenough2burmom:

And in Pennsylvania, the governor is preparing to release the names of 40 Philadelphia public schools waiting for closure. At the same time, he is escalating prison construction to accommodate the expected inmate population from today’s children. His calculus is based on income and minority status — meaning that he’s closing schools for poor children but building them prisons.

approachingsignificance:

11 Stunning Facts About America’s Prisons

  1. In 2009 there were 7.2 million people in prison and under official supervision like probation — a larger population than the state of Washington
  2. Between 1987 and 2007 the national prison population tripled.
  3. 4 in 10 prisoners return to state prisons within three years of release.
  4. One in 30 men between 20 and 34 is behind bars — and up to one in 13 in one state.
  5. One in nine black men between 20 and 34 are behind bars.
  6. 734 out of every 100,000 people are behind bars in the U.S. — far and away the highest number in the world.
  7. The United States is the world’s largest jailer. Russia and South Africa are the closest, but the rates drop dramatically after that.
  8. Part of the bizarre prison black market, a thimbleful of tobacco can fetch up to $50 at a maximum security prison.
  9. Typically parole programs cost taxpayers $7.47 per day per parolee, while prisons cost $78.95 per day per inmate nationwide.
  10. Some prisoners cost more. It costs New Jersey $253 million every year to house just its death row prisoners — $11 million apiece.
  11. Between 1987 and 2007 state prison costs rose by 315 percent to $44.06 billion a year.