Video Exclusive: David Floyd on Why He Sued NYPD

In the last 11 years, the New York City Police Department has conducted a staggering 5 million stop-and-frisks. Of those who were stopped and patted down for “seeming suspicious,” 86 percent were black or Latino, according to an NYCLU report. In 2012 alone, police made 533,042 of these stops with 89 percent resulting in no arrest or ticket.

The city insists that the policy keeps guns off the streets. But young black and Latino men describe scenes of fear and toxic stress, of always wondering if the cops are going to throw them up against a wall, strike them, and arrest them.

Claiming that the stop-and-frisk program feeds on racial profiling and violates the constitutional rights of New Yorkers, the legal advocacy group Center for Constitutional Rights filed Floyd, et al v. City of New York, et al, a federal class action suit that seeks to stop the abuses plaintiffs say are built into the program.

The Floyd hearings began last Monday and are expected to continue for weeks or months. As is often the case in legal proceedings, the hearings will stay mostly in the legal weeds. That can make it easy to forget that this is about the day-to-day lives of millions.

One of those is the man the case is named for, David Floyd, a 33-year-old medical student. Colorlines.com caught up with the lead plaintiff in the biggest cop suit around as he was leaving New York City for school after a week in the city to testify in court. He told us that he’s been stopped and frisked twice and that, as an activist, he’s felt and witnessed the trauma that these day-to-day encounters cause.

Watch Floyd tell his story in this exclusive Colorlines.com video.

—Seth Freed Wessler

[photo: image of a letter from Kimani Gray’s school. to the left there is a picture of him, a young black boy wearing a yellow and striped polo posing with a smaller child of color. text on the photo reads, “forever Kiki.” there are handwritten notes all over the letter. most read along the lines of, “we love you” and “love you forever Kimani.”]
Kimani Gray’s School Sent a Letter to Parents Praising His Academic Abilities
Earlier this week Kimani Gray’s high school, The Urban Assembly School of Design and Construction, sent a letter to parents and staff in honor of the teen who was fatally shot by undercover cops last week after he allegedly pulled a gun on them.
The New York Post published an excerpt of the letter sent to parents and staff:

“We believed in his potential from the day he entered our school,” wrote principal Matt Willoughby. “He traveled for over an hour each day from East Flatbush to Midtown West to our little architectural themed high school. The year and a half we had with Kimani allowed us to get to know his best self.
“Kimani made great strides this year academically. He was taking an extra English class after school; he was writing a dramatic dialogue in another English class; his group in Design class was working on a project to design a school. Now they are working to complete their project without him.”

“He always smiled, he came to school every day, and the kids here miss him,”a teacher told the New York Post. “That says a lot.”
via colorlines.com

[photo: image of a letter from Kimani Gray’s school. to the left there is a picture of him, a young black boy wearing a yellow and striped polo posing with a smaller child of color. text on the photo reads, “forever Kiki.” there are handwritten notes all over the letter. most read along the lines of, “we love you” and “love you forever Kimani.”]

Kimani Gray’s School Sent a Letter to Parents Praising His Academic Abilities

Earlier this week Kimani Gray’s high school, The Urban Assembly School of Design and Construction, sent a letter to parents and staff in honor of the teen who was fatally shot by undercover cops last week after he allegedly pulled a gun on them.

The New York Post published an excerpt of the letter sent to parents and staff:

“We believed in his potential from the day he entered our school,” wrote principal Matt Willoughby. “He traveled for over an hour each day from East Flatbush to Midtown West to our little architectural themed high school. The year and a half we had with Kimani allowed us to get to know his best self.

“Kimani made great strides this year academically. He was taking an extra English class after school; he was writing a dramatic dialogue in another English class; his group in Design class was working on a project to design a school. Now they are working to complete their project without him.”

“He always smiled, he came to school every day, and the kids here miss him,”a teacher told the New York Post. “That says a lot.”

via colorlines.com

Two plainclothes police officers shot and killed a teenage boy late Saturday night on a Brooklyn street, after he pointed a handgun at the officers, the police said.

The police said the officers, patrolling in an unmarked car in East Flatbush, came upon the teenager, identified as Kimani Gray, 16, in a group of men just before 11:30 p.m. The teenager separated himself from the group and adjusted his waistband in what the police described as a suspicious manner.

As officers got out of the car to question him, Mr. Gray turned and pointed a .38-caliber Rohm revolver at them, the police said; two officers fired, hitting the teenager. He was pronounced dead a short time later at Kings County Hospital Center.

Mr. Gray did not fire the handgun, which was recovered at the scene. Paul J. Browne, the chief spokesman for the Police Department, said the six-shot revolver was loaded with four live rounds.

“After the anti-crime sergeant and police officer told the suspect to show his hands, which was heard by witnesses, Gray produced a revolver and pointed it at the officers, who fired a total of 11 rounds, striking Gray several times,” Mr. Browne said.

Mr. Gray’s sister, Mahnefah Gray, 19, said that a witness to the shooting told her that her brother had been fixing his belt when he was shot. She, among others who knew Mr. Gray, said they had never known him to have a gun. Even if he had one on Saturday night, he would not have pointed it at police officers, Ms. Gray said.

“He has common sense,” she said.

A woman who lives across the street from the shooting scene said that after the shots were fired, she saw two men, whom she believed to be plainclothes officers, standing over Mr. Gray, who was prone on the sidewalk, clutching his stomach.

“He said, ‘Please don’t let me die,’ ” said the woman, 46, who gave her name only as Vanessa. One of the officers, she said, replied: “Stay down, or we’ll shoot you again.”

anarcho-queer:

anarcho-queer:

anarcho-queer:

LAPD Shoots And Injures Older Latina Women During Manhunt
LA police shot at two latina women delivering newstands this morning during their manhunt for ex police officer, Christ Dorner.
Emma Hernandez, 71, was delivering the Los Angeles Times with her daughter, 47-year-old Margie Carranza, when officers apparently mistook their pickup for that of Dorner.
Hernandez was shot in the back, and remains hospitalized in stable condition.
Carranza suffered a wound from glass that struck her hand and received stitches.
Another vehicle was also mistakenly fired upon not far away.
The second incident, which involved Torrance police officers, happened around 5:45 a.m. at Flagler Lane and Beryl Street.
The Torrance officers had apparently heard about the nearby incident, and while en route they encountered a dark pickup that looked similar to Dorner’s.
They opened fire on the pickup. The man who was inside was not hit.

Update: Another civilian has been caught up in the manhunt today.
Armed police officers surrounded a Portland man as he sat in a car outside a San Diego hotel.
They believed he was suspected killer Christopher Dorner.
“All of a sudden I turn around and look back and see another [officer] behind a tree with a machine gun and thought, ‘this is not good,’” Greg Pruitt told NBC 7 in San Diego.
Greg Pruitt, 36, of Portland, was ordered to get on the pavement and placed in handcuffs. Officers then checked his identification and realized he was not the former Los Angeles police officer at the center of a multi-state manhunt.
“I didn’t even want to breathe,” Pruitt said in an interview with the San Diego TV station. “You have guns pointed at you, you don’t move, you don’t breathe you don’t blink you don’t ask why, you just do what you’re told.”

Update: Yet another civilian was mistaken for Dorner this week and was met with police violence AFTER being questioned, not too far from the first police shooting.
David Perdue was on his way to sneak in some surfing before work Thursday morning when police flagged him down. They asked who he was and where he was headed, then sent him on his way.
Seconds later, Perdue’s attorney said, a Torrance police cruiser slammed into his pickup and officers opened fire; none of the bullets struck Perdue.
His pickup, police later explained, matched the description of the one belonging to Christopher Jordan Dorner — the ex-cop who has evaded authorities after allegedly killing three and wounding two more. But the pickups were different makes and colors. And Perdue looks nothing like Dorner: He’s several inches shorter and about a hundred pounds lighter. And Perdue is white; Dorner is black.
In related news, more information has emerged concerning the first police shooting that injured two elderly latino women.
Law enforcement sources told The Times that at least seven officers opened fire. On Friday, the street was pockmarked with bullet holes in cars, trees, garage doors and roofs. Residents said they wanted to know what happened.
“How do you mistake two Hispanic women, one who is 71, for a large black male?” said Richard Goo, 62, who counted five bullet holes in the entryway to his house.
Glen T. Jonas, the attorney representing the women, said the police officers gave “no commands, no instructions and no opportunity to surrender” before opening fire. He described a terrifying encounter in which the pair were in the early part of their delivery route through several South Bay communities. Hernandez was in the back seat handing papers to her daughter, who was driving. Carranza would briefly slow the truck to throw papers on driveways and front walks.
Earlier today it was reported that law enforcement are using drones to find Chris Dorner. Spokesman Ralph DeSio of the Customs and Border Patrol confirmed the use of drones. This is thought to be the first time in U.S. history that drones are used to locate a criminal on American soil.

anarcho-queer:

anarcho-queer:

anarcho-queer:

LAPD Shoots And Injures Older Latina Women During Manhunt

LA police shot at two latina women delivering newstands this morning during their manhunt for ex police officer, Christ Dorner.

Emma Hernandez, 71, was delivering the Los Angeles Times with her daughter, 47-year-old Margie Carranza, when officers apparently mistook their pickup for that of Dorner.

Hernandez was shot in the back, and remains hospitalized in stable condition.

Carranza suffered a wound from glass that struck her hand and received stitches.

Another vehicle was also mistakenly fired upon not far away.

The second incident, which involved Torrance police officers, happened around 5:45 a.m. at Flagler Lane and Beryl Street.

The Torrance officers had apparently heard about the nearby incident, and while en route they encountered a dark pickup that looked similar to Dorner’s.

They opened fire on the pickup. The man who was inside was not hit.

Update: Another civilian has been caught up in the manhunt today.

Armed police officers surrounded a Portland man as he sat in a car outside a San Diego hotel.

They believed he was suspected killer Christopher Dorner.

All of a sudden I turn around and look back and see another [officer] behind a tree with a machine gun and thought, ‘this is not good,’” Greg Pruitt told NBC 7 in San Diego.

Greg Pruitt, 36, of Portland, was ordered to get on the pavement and placed in handcuffs. Officers then checked his identification and realized he was not the former Los Angeles police officer at the center of a multi-state manhunt.

I didn’t even want to breathe,” Pruitt said in an interview with the San Diego TV station. “You have guns pointed at you, you don’t move, you don’t breathe you don’t blink you don’t ask why, you just do what you’re told.

Update: Yet another civilian was mistaken for Dorner this week and was met with police violence AFTER being questioned, not too far from the first police shooting.

David Perdue was on his way to sneak in some surfing before work Thursday morning when police flagged him down. They asked who he was and where he was headed, then sent him on his way.

Seconds later, Perdue’s attorney said, a Torrance police cruiser slammed into his pickup and officers opened fire; none of the bullets struck Perdue.

His pickup, police later explained, matched the description of the one belonging to Christopher Jordan Dorner — the ex-cop who has evaded authorities after allegedly killing three and wounding two more. But the pickups were different makes and colors. And Perdue looks nothing like Dorner: He’s several inches shorter and about a hundred pounds lighter. And Perdue is white; Dorner is black.

In related news, more information has emerged concerning the first police shooting that injured two elderly latino women.

Law enforcement sources told The Times that at least seven officers opened fire. On Friday, the street was pockmarked with bullet holes in cars, trees, garage doors and roofs. Residents said they wanted to know what happened.

How do you mistake two Hispanic women, one who is 71, for a large black male?” said Richard Goo, 62, who counted five bullet holes in the entryway to his house.

Glen T. Jonas, the attorney representing the women, said the police officers gave “no commands, no instructions and no opportunity to surrender” before opening fire. He described a terrifying encounter in which the pair were in the early part of their delivery route through several South Bay communities. Hernandez was in the back seat handing papers to her daughter, who was driving. Carranza would briefly slow the truck to throw papers on driveways and front walks.

Earlier today it was reported that law enforcement are using drones to find Chris Dorner. Spokesman Ralph DeSio of the Customs and Border Patrol confirmed the use of drones. This is thought to be the first time in U.S. history that drones are used to locate a criminal on American soil.

anarcho-queer:

Submitted by: sydlow
Thanks sydlow! I just sent this flier to organizers and they love it.

Justice for Reynaldo Cuevas
Reynaldo Cuevas was shot and killed by an NYPD officer on September 7th, 2012, after escaping from an armed robbery at the bodega he worked at. He was dragged 25 feet away by police and left to bleed for 20 minutes as witnesses yelled at them, informing police that he was an employee of the store. A few days later the community held a vigil for Reynaldo and marched with his family to the 42nd precinct to demand justice. Since then, the Cuevas family has held a candlelight vigil every Saturday at the corner of the block here he was killed. Less than two months later, on October 27th, the NYPD rammed into the dirt bike Reynaldo’s cousin and friend were riding, killing one and paralyzing the other. A witness from the scene says the NYPD rammed into the dirt bike purposely. 
We need to let the NYPD know, they cannot get away with this. We will not give up. We are stronger.
More information on facebook, search for “Justice for Reynaldo Cuevas”

anarcho-queer:

Submitted by: sydlow

Thanks sydlow! I just sent this flier to organizers and they love it.

Justice for Reynaldo Cuevas

Reynaldo Cuevas was shot and killed by an NYPD officer on September 7th, 2012, after escaping from an armed robbery at the bodega he worked at. He was dragged 25 feet away by police and left to bleed for 20 minutes as witnesses yelled at them, informing police that he was an employee of the store. A few days later the community held a vigil for Reynaldo and marched with his family to the 42nd precinct to demand justice. Since then, the Cuevas family has held a candlelight vigil every Saturday at the corner of the block here he was killed. Less than two months later, on October 27th, the NYPD rammed into the dirt bike Reynaldo’s cousin and friend were riding, killing one and paralyzing the other. A witness from the scene says the NYPD rammed into the dirt bike purposely. 

We need to let the NYPD know, they cannot get away with this. We will not give up. We are stronger.

More information on facebook, search for “Justice for Reynaldo Cuevas”

thepeoplesrecord:

Chicago homocide rate 2013 already at 42 before end of JanuaryJanuary 31, 2013
A bloody weekend in which seven people were killed and six wounded has put an abrupt end – at least for now – to hopes that Chicago was at least putting a lid on its frightening homicide rate.
With a few days left in the month, the nation’s third-largest city now finds itself on the cusp of its deadliest January in more than a decade. The news comes just after Police Superintendent Garry McCarthy had announced that after several violent months, Chicago had seen a drop in homicides at the end of 2012 and for the first few weeks of 2013.
Police say the homicide rate is a reflection of the city’s gang problem and a proliferation of guns. (Read below for our thoughts on this minimal explanation) Chicago has for years tried to cut off the flow of guns. It has what city officials have called the strictest handgun ordinance in the U.S. But police officials say more needs to be done and that penalties for violating gun laws should be stiffer.
Among those killed over the weekend was 34-year-old Ronnie Chambers, who was shot in the head with what police believe was an assault weapon. Such guns are banned in Chicago but can be purchased legally in the suburbs or nearby states. Chambers is the fourth child of Shirley Chambers to fall victim to gun violence.
“I’d pray for God to protect Ronnie and keep him safe day and night,” Shirley Chambers told the Chicago Sun-Times.
With the weekend shootings, Chicago now has 40 homicides – the exact same number as last January. With a few days left in the year, the city could reach its deadliest January since 2002, when it had 45 homicides in the first month.
Chicago’s homicide count eclipsed 500 last year for the first time since 2008, but last week, McCarthy announced recent figures showing homicides had dropped. The city saw a 16 percent decline in the fourth quarter of 2012 and a 22 percent drop in the first weeks of January.
McCarthy wants lawmakers to increase jail time for those who are caught with illegal weapons, including for felons who aren’t allowed to have them and for so-called straw purchases, in which people buy guns for others who aren’t supposed to have them.
Chicago’s handgun ordinance bans gun shops in the city and prohibits gun owners from stepping outside their homes with a handgun. The city passed the restrictions in July 2010 after the U.S. Supreme Court struck down an outright ban that Chicago had for 28 years.
Chicago leads the nation in guns seized by police, and recently police have started displaying the guns each week to offer a visual reminder of the awesome firepower that is on the city’s streets as they push for tougher gun laws. First Deputy Superintendent Al Wysinger said Monday that last year’s total of 7,400 is nine times as high as the number seized in the nation’s largest city, New York, and three times as high as in its second-largest, Los Angeles.
So far this year, Chicago officers have taken 574 firearms, Wysinger said Monday.
Wysinger called the spate of shootings “frustrating” for the department. But he said the number does not mean there are problems with changes the department has made to combat crime, particularly a strategy to focus on gang members and gang activity.
“Without this gang violence reduction strategy this weekend could have been a lot worse than it was,” he told reporters.
McCarthy last week noted that New York finished 2012 with 418 homicides, a record low. He said New York’s stiffer penalties for gun violations help. McCarthy has repeatedly mentioned Plaxico Burress, the NFL football player who spent 20 months in prison on a gun charge after accidentally shot himself, as an example of New York’s tough gun laws.
“We are doing the same exact things New York is doing,” said McCarthy, a former high ranking member of that city’s police department. “What is different is the reasonability of the New York gun laws.”
Source
This was published before Hadiya Pendleton, the girl who performed at the Inauguration, was shot & killed on Tuesday in Chicago.
Most articles about the violence in Chicago never even mention the influence poverty has on these murders that occur in communities of color. Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor wrote a great piece we’ve posted before called “Poverty pulls the trigger.” She wrote:
“Simplistic explanations for serious issues help to produce simplistic solutions that make for good sound bites but do nothing to actually address the real problem of crime and violence in poor and working-class communities of color. For example, a recent report made it clear that these murders are concentrated in the poorest and most-segregated neighborhoods in the city.
In fact, it would be more descriptive and accurate to describe the wave of violence in Chicago as “poverty-on-poverty” or “segregated-on-segregated” crime because that is the actual source of the tensions that have boiled over and led to the heightened murder rate in the city.
While Rahm Emanuel recently described the Chicago economy as “booming,” in the two-thirds of the city that is predominantly Black and Brown, there is an economic depression.”
One of Rahm Emanuel’s simplistic solutions is to put 200 more cops on Chicago’s streets.

thepeoplesrecord:

Chicago homocide rate 2013 already at 42 before end of January
January 31, 2013

A bloody weekend in which seven people were killed and six wounded has put an abrupt end – at least for now – to hopes that Chicago was at least putting a lid on its frightening homicide rate.

With a few days left in the month, the nation’s third-largest city now finds itself on the cusp of its deadliest January in more than a decade. The news comes just after Police Superintendent Garry McCarthy had announced that after several violent months, Chicago had seen a drop in homicides at the end of 2012 and for the first few weeks of 2013.

Police say the homicide rate is a reflection of the city’s gang problem and a proliferation of guns. (Read below for our thoughts on this minimal explanation) Chicago has for years tried to cut off the flow of guns. It has what city officials have called the strictest handgun ordinance in the U.S. But police officials say more needs to be done and that penalties for violating gun laws should be stiffer.

Among those killed over the weekend was 34-year-old Ronnie Chambers, who was shot in the head with what police believe was an assault weapon. Such guns are banned in Chicago but can be purchased legally in the suburbs or nearby states. Chambers is the fourth child of Shirley Chambers to fall victim to gun violence.

“I’d pray for God to protect Ronnie and keep him safe day and night,” Shirley Chambers told the Chicago Sun-Times.

With the weekend shootings, Chicago now has 40 homicides – the exact same number as last January. With a few days left in the year, the city could reach its deadliest January since 2002, when it had 45 homicides in the first month.

Chicago’s homicide count eclipsed 500 last year for the first time since 2008, but last week, McCarthy announced recent figures showing homicides had dropped. The city saw a 16 percent decline in the fourth quarter of 2012 and a 22 percent drop in the first weeks of January.

McCarthy wants lawmakers to increase jail time for those who are caught with illegal weapons, including for felons who aren’t allowed to have them and for so-called straw purchases, in which people buy guns for others who aren’t supposed to have them.

Chicago’s handgun ordinance bans gun shops in the city and prohibits gun owners from stepping outside their homes with a handgun. The city passed the restrictions in July 2010 after the U.S. Supreme Court struck down an outright ban that Chicago had for 28 years.

Chicago leads the nation in guns seized by police, and recently police have started displaying the guns each week to offer a visual reminder of the awesome firepower that is on the city’s streets as they push for tougher gun laws. First Deputy Superintendent Al Wysinger said Monday that last year’s total of 7,400 is nine times as high as the number seized in the nation’s largest city, New York, and three times as high as in its second-largest, Los Angeles.

So far this year, Chicago officers have taken 574 firearms, Wysinger said Monday.

Wysinger called the spate of shootings “frustrating” for the department. But he said the number does not mean there are problems with changes the department has made to combat crime, particularly a strategy to focus on gang members and gang activity.

“Without this gang violence reduction strategy this weekend could have been a lot worse than it was,” he told reporters.

McCarthy last week noted that New York finished 2012 with 418 homicides, a record low. He said New York’s stiffer penalties for gun violations help. McCarthy has repeatedly mentioned Plaxico Burress, the NFL football player who spent 20 months in prison on a gun charge after accidentally shot himself, as an example of New York’s tough gun laws.

“We are doing the same exact things New York is doing,” said McCarthy, a former high ranking member of that city’s police department. “What is different is the reasonability of the New York gun laws.”

Source

This was published before Hadiya Pendleton, the girl who performed at the Inauguration, was shot & killed on Tuesday in Chicago.

Most articles about the violence in Chicago never even mention the influence poverty has on these murders that occur in communities of color. Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor wrote a great piece we’ve posted before called “Poverty pulls the trigger.” She wrote:

“Simplistic explanations for serious issues help to produce simplistic solutions that make for good sound bites but do nothing to actually address the real problem of crime and violence in poor and working-class communities of color. For example, a recent report made it clear that these murders are concentrated in the poorest and most-segregated neighborhoods in the city.

In fact, it would be more descriptive and accurate to describe the wave of violence in Chicago as “poverty-on-poverty” or “segregated-on-segregated” crime because that is the actual source of the tensions that have boiled over and led to the heightened murder rate in the city.

While Rahm Emanuel recently described the Chicago economy as “booming,” in the two-thirds of the city that is predominantly Black and Brown, there is an economic depression.”

One of Rahm Emanuel’s simplistic solutions is to put 200 more cops on Chicago’s streets.

TRIGGER WARNING: police brutality, abuse of power, police harassment of a child.
firstladysexyfineass:

hiphopandinsubordination:

thirdeyeblinking:

datingdisastersofaqueergirl:

kemetically-afrolatino:

NYPD Cops handcuff and interrogate Bronx boy, 7, for 10hours over missing $5




“Reyes was handcuffed and verbally, physically and emotionally abused, intimidated, humiliated, embarrassed and defamed,” the documents say. He was then charged with robbery.
“My son was crying, ‘Mommy, it wasn’t me! Mommy, it wasn’t me!’ I never imagined the cops could do that to a child. We’re traumatized,” Wilson Reyes’ distraught mom, Frances Mendez told The Post last night.
“Imagine how I felt seeing my son in handcuffs!’’ she said. “It was horrible. I couldn’t believe what I was seeing.”






it’s a racist police state in The Bronx, raising kids to be criminals.
school-to-prison pipeline is in full effect #thenewjimcrow



SEVEN FUCKING YEARS OLD
ACAB doesn’t even come close. 

HE IS A BABY 

HE’S A FUCKING CHILD. The fuck, yo?

WHAT THE FUCK

oh jesus fuck
TRIGGER WARNING: police brutality, abuse of power, police harassment of a child.

TRIGGER WARNING: police brutality, abuse of power, police harassment of a child.

firstladysexyfineass:

hiphopandinsubordination:

thirdeyeblinking:

datingdisastersofaqueergirl:

kemetically-afrolatino:

NYPD Cops handcuff and interrogate Bronx boy, 7, for 10hours over missing $5

“Reyes was handcuffed and verbally, physically and emotionally abused, intimidated, humiliated, embarrassed and defamed,” the documents say. He was then charged with robbery.

“My son was crying, ‘Mommy, it wasn’t me! Mommy, it wasn’t me!’ I never imagined the cops could do that to a child. We’re traumatized,” Wilson Reyes’ distraught mom, Frances Mendez told The Post last night.

“Imagine how I felt seeing my son in handcuffs!’’ she said. “It was horrible. I couldn’t believe what I was seeing.”

it’s a racist police state in The Bronx, raising kids to be criminals.

school-to-prison pipeline is in full effect #thenewjimcrow

SEVEN FUCKING YEARS OLD

ACAB doesn’t even come close. 

HE IS A BABY 

HE’S A FUCKING CHILD. The fuck, yo?

WHAT THE FUCK

oh jesus fuck

TRIGGER WARNING: police brutality, abuse of power, police harassment of a child.

ebbandflower:

17 June 2012

End Stop and Frisk: Silent March Against Racial Profiling

http://www.silentmarchnyc.org/

anarcho-queer:


NYPD Arrests Homeless Man And Puts Him In Body Bag
Thursday (December 20) afternoon in midtown New York City (57th street and 10th avenue) a handful of NYPD thugs stood around waiting for an ambulance to pick up a man they had arrested and then put into a bodybag. The bag covered the man´s entire body, except for his boots.
The man could be heard saying to the officers, “You´ve had me on the ground for an hour! I can´t get transported or nothing!? when you take this off my eyes, I´m taking everybody´s names and numbers!” In response, the officers just stood around laughing because they know, just as well as we all do, that NYPD officers can get away with almost any kind of mental, verbal, or physical abuse and violence against those they arrest.
When the ambulance finally arrived, the officers picked up the man, still in the bag, and roughly put him onto a stretcher. The ambulance took him away. It is thought that the man might be one of the neighborhood´s homeless people who often sit in front of stores in the area. It is not known by us what the situation was that led up to the arrest, or why the officers put the man into the bag. The fact that he was sent away in an ambulance, and not in a police car, is indicative that the man had health problems.
Related: Oakland Police hogties woman, puts a bag over her face and strap her to a stretcher

anarcho-queer:

NYPD Arrests Homeless Man And Puts Him In Body Bag

Thursday (December 20) afternoon in midtown New York City (57th street and 10th avenue) a handful of NYPD thugs stood around waiting for an ambulance to pick up a man they had arrested and then put into a bodybag. The bag covered the man´s entire body, except for his boots.

The man could be heard saying to the officers, “You´ve had me on the ground for an hour! I can´t get transported or nothing!? when you take this off my eyes, I´m taking everybody´s names and numbers!In response, the officers just stood around laughing because they know, just as well as we all do, that NYPD officers can get away with almost any kind of mental, verbal, or physical abuse and violence against those they arrest.

When the ambulance finally arrived, the officers picked up the man, still in the bag, and roughly put him onto a stretcher. The ambulance took him away. It is thought that the man might be one of the neighborhood´s homeless people who often sit in front of stores in the area. It is not known by us what the situation was that led up to the arrest, or why the officers put the man into the bag. The fact that he was sent away in an ambulance, and not in a police car, is indicative that the man had health problems.

Related: Oakland Police hogties woman, puts a bag over her face and strap her to a stretcher

reclaimingthelatinatag:

Austin, May 28, 1981.
A Dallas member of the Brown Berets, a Chicano activist group organize in the late 60’s at a police brutality demonstration.

reclaimingthelatinatag:

Austin, May 28, 1981.

A Dallas member of the Brown Berets, a Chicano activist group organize in the late 60’s at a police brutality demonstration.

kamikazemilkman:

“When about 650 members of community, labor and faith organizations rallied today in Elwood, Illinois in support of workers at a key Walmart warehouse striking to protest “poverty wages,” sexual harassment, racial discrimination and extreme work conditions, they were met with riot-gear-clad police and the private security Illinois Law Enforcement Alarm System Mobile Field Force who surrounded them, arrested all 47 who committed civil disobedience by sitting in the road, and told the other peaceful protesters to disperse or risk “chemical or less lethal munitions being deployed.””

kamikazemilkman:

When about 650 members of community, labor and faith organizations rallied today in Elwood, Illinois in support of workers at a key Walmart warehouse striking to protest “poverty wages,” sexual harassment, racial discrimination and extreme work conditions, they were met with riot-gear-clad police and the private security Illinois Law Enforcement Alarm System Mobile Field Force who surrounded them, arrested all 47 who committed civil disobedience by sitting in the road, and told the other peaceful protesters to disperse or risk “chemical or less lethal munitions being deployed.””

jalwhite:

 Tamon Robinson’s Mother, Laverne Dobbinson, Owes NYPD $710 For Damages To Police Car That Killed Son 


In April 2012, Tamon Robinson was struck and killed by an NYPD police car after Robinson was allegedly caught stealing cobblestones from a public housing complex.
Six months later, Robinson’s mother says the city is ordering the family to pay $710 to pay for the damages on the very car that killed her 27-year-old son.
45-year-old Laverne Dobbinson told The Daily News, “We’re still grieving, and this is like a slap in the face. They want my son to pay for damage to the vehicle that killed him. It’s crazy.”
An attorney for the family filed an intent to sue the city and hopes to prevent the department from issuing any repairs to the vehicle as the case is still under investigation. “In my 40 years of practicing law in this city I have never seen anything as heartless as this,” the lawyer told The News, referring to the bill sent to Tamon’s family.
According to police, the car was stopped when Robinson ran into it. Witnesses, however, maintain the car hit Robinson directly.
A witness described the incident, claiming, “They hit him. He flew up and he came down. They backed the car up, and they told him to get up. People were yelling out their windows screaming at the cops, ‘We saw what you did.’ ”
Robinson was rushed to a nearby hospital where he fell into a coma. While unconscious, cops kept him  handcuffed to the hospital bed. Six days later, he was declared brain dead and his family made the decision to take him off the respirator.
Rev. Al Sharpton held a rally in honor of Robinson and demanded an investigation, which is still in process, to look into any criminal wrongdoing in the young man’s death.
An NYPD spokesman declined to comment on the $710 bill.

jalwhite:

Tamon Robinson’s Mother, Laverne Dobbinson, Owes NYPD $710 For Damages To Police Car That Killed Son

In April 2012, Tamon Robinson was struck and killed by an NYPD police car after Robinson was allegedly caught stealing cobblestones from a public housing complex.

Six months later, Robinson’s mother says the city is ordering the family to pay $710 to pay for the damages on the very car that killed her 27-year-old son.

45-year-old Laverne Dobbinson told The Daily News, “We’re still grieving, and this is like a slap in the face. They want my son to pay for damage to the vehicle that killed him. It’s crazy.”

An attorney for the family filed an intent to sue the city and hopes to prevent the department from issuing any repairs to the vehicle as the case is still under investigation. “In my 40 years of practicing law in this city I have never seen anything as heartless as this,” the lawyer told The News, referring to the bill sent to Tamon’s family.

According to police, the car was stopped when Robinson ran into it. Witnesses, however, maintain the car hit Robinson directly.

A witness described the incident, claiming, “They hit him. He flew up and he came down. They backed the car up, and they told him to get up. People were yelling out their windows screaming at the cops, ‘We saw what you did.’ ”

Robinson was rushed to a nearby hospital where he fell into a coma. While unconscious, cops kept him handcuffed to the hospital bed. Six days later, he was declared brain dead and his family made the decision to take him off the respirator.

Rev. Al Sharpton held a rally in honor of Robinson and demanded an investigation, which is still in process, to look into any criminal wrongdoing in the young man’s death.

An NYPD spokesman declined to comment on the $710 bill.

anarcho-queer:

Police Tasered 12-Year-Old For Crying After He Tackled Her Mother Over Traffic Ticket Warrants
A 12-year-old girl is recovering after being Tasered in a St. Louis Victoria’s Secret while police officers were trying to arrest her mother over warrants for traffic tickets.
The mother is now demanding an investigation, even though police insist their actions were appropriate.
Dejamon Baker showed KSDK the wounds on her chest and stomach from the Taser probes.
“This one goes in my chest,” the girl explained. “It was stuck in there so she had to keep on pulling trying to pull it out.”
“I had fell on the floor and I couldn’t control myself I just kept on shaking and stuff.”
A spokesperson for the police department said that Baker had interfered while officers were trying to arrest her mother, Charlene Bratton, for outstanding warrants due to unresolved traffic tickets.
“He said, put your hands behind your back. I said for what,” Bratton recalled. “Next thing you know he tackled me down on the ground.”
Both Baker and Bratton deny that the 12-year-old girl interfered with the arrest.
“I was just crying. I guess he got mad because I was crying or something, then he just took it out and just Tased me,” Baker insisted.
Bratton added: “He should have had enough control to tell her to get back instead of pulling out his gun, I guess he was nervous or whatever, and Tasing people.”
The police spokesperson said that the officer’s actions were justified, and advised Bratton to contact the department’s internal affairs division to launch an investigation.

anarcho-queer:

Police Tasered 12-Year-Old For Crying After He Tackled Her Mother Over Traffic Ticket Warrants

A 12-year-old girl is recovering after being Tasered in a St. Louis Victoria’s Secret while police officers were trying to arrest her mother over warrants for traffic tickets.

The mother is now demanding an investigation, even though police insist their actions were appropriate.

Dejamon Baker showed KSDK the wounds on her chest and stomach from the Taser probes.

This one goes in my chest,” the girl explained. “It was stuck in there so she had to keep on pulling trying to pull it out.

I had fell on the floor and I couldn’t control myself I just kept on shaking and stuff.

A spokesperson for the police department said that Baker had interfered while officers were trying to arrest her mother, Charlene Bratton, for outstanding warrants due to unresolved traffic tickets.

He said, put your hands behind your back. I said for what,” Bratton recalled. “Next thing you know he tackled me down on the ground.

Both Baker and Bratton deny that the 12-year-old girl interfered with the arrest.

I was just crying. I guess he got mad because I was crying or something, then he just took it out and just Tased me,” Baker insisted.

Bratton added: “He should have had enough control to tell her to get back instead of pulling out his gun, I guess he was nervous or whatever, and Tasing people.

The police spokesperson said that the officer’s actions were justified, and advised Bratton to contact the department’s internal affairs division to launch an investigation.

anarcho-queer:



Handcuffed Man Shot in Back of Police Car
A 21-year-old man was found shot in the head while handcuffed in the back of a patrol car Saturday night. Now police have launched an investigation to determine what happened.
Chavis Carter was a passenger in a pickup truck that was stopped by police in Jonesboro, Ark., Saturday night, according to KAIT, an ABC-affiliated television station. An officer reportedly found some marijuana, and ran Carter’s information. He was wanted on a warrant out of Mississippi, so officers placed him in a patrol car.
“As protocol, he was handcuffed behind his back, double-locked and searched,” said Jonesboro Police Department Sgt. Lyle Waterworth in an interview with WREG-TV.
Just minutes later, police said they heard a thumping noise, turned around and found Carter shot in the head.
Waterworth said he thinks Carter pulled out a hidden gun and shot himself. “Any given officer has missed something on a search, you know, be it drugs, be it knives, be it razor blades,” he said. “This instance, it happened to be a gun.”
His mother, Teresa Carter, disagrees. “I think they killed him,” she said. “My son wasn’t suicidal.”
Carter said she was also told her son was shot in the right temple, although he was left-handed. “I mean, I just want to know what really happened,” she told WREG-TV. “That’s all I want to know.”
The two officers who were present when Carter was found shot were placed on administrative leave.

anarcho-queer:

Handcuffed Man Shot in Back of Police Car

A 21-year-old man was found shot in the head while handcuffed in the back of a patrol car Saturday night. Now police have launched an investigation to determine what happened.

Chavis Carter was a passenger in a pickup truck that was stopped by police in Jonesboro, Ark., Saturday night, according to KAIT, an ABC-affiliated television station. An officer reportedly found some marijuana, and ran Carter’s information. He was wanted on a warrant out of Mississippi, so officers placed him in a patrol car.

As protocol, he was handcuffed behind his back, double-locked and searched,” said Jonesboro Police Department Sgt. Lyle Waterworth in an interview with WREG-TV.

Just minutes later, police said they heard a thumping noise, turned around and found Carter shot in the head.

Waterworth said he thinks Carter pulled out a hidden gun and shot himself. “Any given officer has missed something on a search, you know, be it drugs, be it knives, be it razor blades,” he said. “This instance, it happened to be a gun.”

His mother, Teresa Carter, disagrees. “I think they killed him,” she said. “My son wasn’t suicidal.

Carter said she was also told her son was shot in the right temple, although he was left-handed.I mean, I just want to know what really happened,” she told WREG-TV. “That’s all I want to know.

The two officers who were present when Carter was found shot were placed on administrative leave.

ceasesilence:

**TRIGGER WARNING RACISM, POLICE ABUSE OF POWER, VIOLENCE**
duskypants:

TW: Racism
occupyallstreets:



NYPD Threaten And Intimidate Activists For For Recording Police
Two West Harlem residents, Christina Gonzalez, 25, and Matthew Swaye, 35, ran into a surprise when they showed up for a community meeting at their local NYPD precinct last week. There, on the wall of the 30th Precinct, were their mug shots—only they weren’t wanted for any crime.
Christina Gonzalez and Matthew Swaye are police reform activists who regularly film police interactions in their neighborhood, especially to record the NYPD’s controversial Stop and Frisk policy. Although filming police is completely legal, the poster (which was full of misspellings, I might add), advised officers to “be aware” that these ”professional agitators” not only film police “performing routine stops,” but also” post the videos on YouTube.
“Subjects purpose is to portray officers in a negative way and to [sic] deter officers from conducting their [sic] responsibilities.” the warning from Sergeant Nicholson reads. “Do not feed into above subjects’ propaganda.”
Gonzalez says it is the NYPD spreading propaganda and that the poster is an obvious tactic to criminalize, intimidate and target her. Since Gonzalez became involved with Occupy and the Stop-and-Frisk movement this fall, police have given her plenty of reasons to look over her shoulder, including calling her out by name and address, erecting a watchtower on her corner and aggressively arresting her sister in front of Gonzalez.
Of course, this is not the first time the NYPD or other police departments have targeted activists. The New York police have a history of infiltrating and intimidating activists, particularly during the Black Panther movement of the 1960s and 1970s. 
For activists like Gonzalez, Stop-and-Frisk, a racial profiling tactic, is not only a violation of one’s constitutional rights, it is also part of the NYPD’s larger apparatus of racial oppression. Police stop more than 700,00 people per year, almost 90 percent of whom are young Black and Latino men. The best defense against the illegal searches, which occur during about 50% of stops, has proven to be video, and the ACLU recently launched an app to combat and document unconstitutional stops. But while the movement relies on cameras to expose Stop-and-Frisk, the NYPD targets filmers like Gonzalez with the same type of surveillance and repression police have used against activists in the past. 
Gonzalez, who grew up in Far Rockaway, Queens, and graduated magnum cum laude from John Jay College of Criminal Justice last year, has long been familiar with the NYPD—though rarely appreciative of their services. A few years ago, she was a victim of intimate partner violence, and the NYPD routinely refused to help her.
“They blamed me for my own abuse,” Gonzalez said. “The police were supposed to protect me.” Her former partner is currently incarcerated for assaulting his latest girlfriend. 
Gonzalez says police are familiar with her and her activism, and that as the movement to reform Stop-and-Frisk grows, so, too, does the police reaction.  Gonzalez said that, the more she filmed, demonstrated, and was arrested, the more police noticed her, often calling her by name and making comments like, “we remember you,” or, “be careful walking home; it’s a long walk to 153rd Street.”
“That’s when I said, ‘Okay, they know where we live.’ That was kind of scary, especially to say in front of my little sister.”
In February, Gonzalez learned the NYPD were watching her YouTube page, where she posted videos of police harassment, such as the time officers taunted Gonzalez by telling her that her dreadlocked hair smells. Shortly after she posted the video, two officers called her by name over to their police car.
Read More



**TRIGGER WARNING RACISM, POLICE ABUSE OF POWER, VIOLENCE**

ceasesilence:

**TRIGGER WARNING RACISM, POLICE ABUSE OF POWER, VIOLENCE**

duskypants:

TW: Racism

occupyallstreets:

NYPD Threaten And Intimidate Activists For For Recording Police

Two West Harlem residents, Christina Gonzalez, 25, and Matthew Swaye, 35, ran into a surprise when they showed up for a community meeting at their local NYPD precinct last week. There, on the wall of the 30th Precinct, were their mug shots—only they weren’t wanted for any crime.

Christina Gonzalez and Matthew Swaye are police reform activists who regularly film police interactions in their neighborhood, especially to record the NYPD’s controversial Stop and Frisk policy. Although filming police is completely legal, the poster (which was full of misspellings, I might add), advised officers to “be aware” that these ”professional agitators” not only film police “performing routine stops,” but also” post the videos on YouTube.

Subjects purpose is to portray officers in a negative way and to [sic] deter officers from conducting their [sic] responsibilities.” the warning from Sergeant Nicholson reads. “Do not feed into above subjects’ propaganda.

Gonzalez says it is the NYPD spreading propaganda and that the poster is an obvious tactic to criminalize, intimidate and target her. Since Gonzalez became involved with Occupy and the Stop-and-Frisk movement this fall, police have given her plenty of reasons to look over her shoulder, including calling her out by name and address, erecting a watchtower on her corner and aggressively arresting her sister in front of Gonzalez.

Of course, this is not the first time the NYPD or other police departments have targeted activists. The New York police have a history of infiltrating and intimidating activists, particularly during the Black Panther movement of the 1960s and 1970s. 

For activists like Gonzalez, Stop-and-Frisk, a racial profiling tactic, is not only a violation of one’s constitutional rights, it is also part of the NYPD’s larger apparatus of racial oppression. Police stop more than 700,00 people per year, almost 90 percent of whom are young Black and Latino men. The best defense against the illegal searches, which occur during about 50% of stops, has proven to be video, and the ACLU recently launched an app to combat and document unconstitutional stops. But while the movement relies on cameras to expose Stop-and-Frisk, the NYPD targets filmers like Gonzalez with the same type of surveillance and repression police have used against activists in the past. 

Gonzalez, who grew up in Far Rockaway, Queens, and graduated magnum cum laude from John Jay College of Criminal Justice last year, has long been familiar with the NYPD—though rarely appreciative of their services. A few years ago, she was a victim of intimate partner violence, and the NYPD routinely refused to help her.

They blamed me for my own abuse,” Gonzalez said. “The police were supposed to protect me.” Her former partner is currently incarcerated for assaulting his latest girlfriend. 

Gonzalez says police are familiar with her and her activism, and that as the movement to reform Stop-and-Frisk grows, so, too, does the police reaction.  Gonzalez said that, the more she filmed, demonstrated, and was arrested, the more police noticed her, often calling her by name and making comments like, “we remember you,” or, “be careful walking home; it’s a long walk to 153rd Street.

That’s when I said, ‘Okay, they know where we live.’ That was kind of scary, especially to say in front of my little sister.

In February, Gonzalez learned the NYPD were watching her YouTube page, where she posted videos of police harassment, such as the time officers taunted Gonzalez by telling her that her dreadlocked hair smells. Shortly after she posted the video, two officers called her by name over to their police car.

Read More

**TRIGGER WARNING RACISM, POLICE ABUSE OF POWER, VIOLENCE**