justice4janitors:

Five days a week, Veronica Ramos-Lopez rides with her coworkers to work as a janitor at Chase Bank’s Polaris offices. She works from 5:30 p.m. until 2 a.m. most nights, cleaning bathroom after bathroom with an arsenal of cleaning chemicals. It’s hard work that doesn’t even offer sick days, meaning that Veronica often has no choice but to work while sick if she falls ill.
Despite hard work from Veronica and her coworkers at Mid-American Cleaning, if another janitor is absent, everyone else’s workload increases – with no extra time allowed to complete it. This not only makes the work harder, but also affects the quality of work janitors are able to perform. Veronica is grateful that she hasn’t had an injury on the job yet, but wonders if it may only be a matter of time.
Veronica’s story is too common among working people in Columbus. Columbus janitors are among the thousands of working people in our city who can work full time and still qualify for public assistance. Despite the city’s wealth, janitors are paid only $10 per hour, meaning that most full-time janitors receive less than $19,000 each year – well below the poverty level for a family of three.
This stands in stark contrast with the city’s Fortune 1000 CEOs whose offices the janitors clean: in 2011, eleven Fortune 1000 CEOs headquartered in Columbus took home a combined $134 million in pay. In an economy as healthy as Columbus’s, there is no excuse for poverty to exist among hard-working families.
The injustice evident here is not lost on Veronica, who lives with some of her coworkers in an attempt to make ends meet. She has an eight-year-old daughter who qualifies for Medicaid and a nineteen-year-old son who works in a factory nearby because he can’t afford to go to college.
With the janitors’ contract now being renegotiated, Veronica knows that if she and her coworkers do not receive raises as they have in the past, paying for rent and the increased cost of groceries will be next to impossible. Already, her rent and bills take up about half of her paycheck, leaving little for groceries and clothing for her growing son and daughter. Her dream of sending her children to college may be out of reach if corporate leaders don’t stand up for family-sustaining wages across Columbus.

http://justice4janitors.tumblr.com/ is a follow-worthy blog doing important work for the janitors of Ohio. This is from the description on their page:

Columbus and Cincinnati janitors clean the headquarters of some of the biggest and most profitable corporations in the country. Despite their hard work, full-time janitors in Cincinnati and Columbus are on average paid less than $18,200 a year—below the poverty level and not nearly enough to support a family. They are now trying to negotiate new contracts with the cleaning contractors who employ them. Will you join them to take a stand for living wages and benefits?
Sign the Columbus petition
Sign the Cincinnati petition

justice4janitors:

Five days a week, Veronica Ramos-Lopez rides with her coworkers to work as a janitor at Chase Bank’s Polaris offices. She works from 5:30 p.m. until 2 a.m. most nights, cleaning bathroom after bathroom with an arsenal of cleaning chemicals. It’s hard work that doesn’t even offer sick days, meaning that Veronica often has no choice but to work while sick if she falls ill.

Despite hard work from Veronica and her coworkers at Mid-American Cleaning, if another janitor is absent, everyone else’s workload increases – with no extra time allowed to complete it. This not only makes the work harder, but also affects the quality of work janitors are able to perform. Veronica is grateful that she hasn’t had an injury on the job yet, but wonders if it may only be a matter of time.

Veronica’s story is too common among working people in Columbus. Columbus janitors are among the thousands of working people in our city who can work full time and still qualify for public assistance. Despite the city’s wealth, janitors are paid only $10 per hour, meaning that most full-time janitors receive less than $19,000 each year – well below the poverty level for a family of three.

This stands in stark contrast with the city’s Fortune 1000 CEOs whose offices the janitors clean: in 2011, eleven Fortune 1000 CEOs headquartered in Columbus took home a combined $134 million in pay. In an economy as healthy as Columbus’s, there is no excuse for poverty to exist among hard-working families.

The injustice evident here is not lost on Veronica, who lives with some of her coworkers in an attempt to make ends meet. She has an eight-year-old daughter who qualifies for Medicaid and a nineteen-year-old son who works in a factory nearby because he can’t afford to go to college.

With the janitors’ contract now being renegotiated, Veronica knows that if she and her coworkers do not receive raises as they have in the past, paying for rent and the increased cost of groceries will be next to impossible. Already, her rent and bills take up about half of her paycheck, leaving little for groceries and clothing for her growing son and daughter. Her dream of sending her children to college may be out of reach if corporate leaders don’t stand up for family-sustaining wages across Columbus.

http://justice4janitors.tumblr.com/ is a follow-worthy blog doing important work for the janitors of Ohio. This is from the description on their page:

Columbus and Cincinnati janitors clean the headquarters of some of the biggest and most profitable corporations in the country. Despite their hard work, full-time janitors in Cincinnati and Columbus are on average paid less than $18,200 a year—below the poverty level and not nearly enough to support a family. They are now trying to negotiate new contracts with the cleaning contractors who employ them. Will you join them to take a stand for living wages and benefits?

Sign the Columbus petition

Sign the Cincinnati petition

thepeoplesrecord:

justice4janitors:

Ruby Bishop is a mother of 4 and a grandmother. She’s also a janitor at the Scripps building in downtown Cincinnati. Every night, Ruby cleans the offices of parents and grandparents whose lives are very different than hers. 
As a single mom working low wage jobs, Ruby always had to rely on food stamps to feed herself and her children. While her kids were growing up, she often had to balance multiple jobs in order to keep a roof over their heads, and then barely had time to spend with them. 
 “Every single day was a struggle,” Ruby says. “I get so sad when I see the young moms I work with trying to do it now, because I know exactly how hard it is.”
Ruby says she inherited her work ethic from her mom, who raised 15 children by herself in Kentucky.
“She taught me to respect people and to make it on my own,” Ruby says. “So that’s what I’ve done. I’ve made it on my own, but it’s been hard.”
Ruby lives with a friend in order to afford rent. She has no health insurance, so she doesn’t take the blood pressure medicine she needs. She just can’t afford it. About a year ago, Ruby had to have emergency dental surgery. Because she didn’t have insurance and couldn’t pay the full amount, the doctor sued her for the cost of the surgery. Now her wages are garnished every paycheck to pay off the medical bill.
“I don’t go to the doctor anymore,” Ruby says. “Not for anything.”
Thousands of Cincinnatians are in the same boat as Ruby. While the CEOs of our city’s Fortune 500 companies have helped themselves to higher salaries and bigger bonuses, poverty and segregation in our city have been rising steadily. Cincinnati currently has a poverty rate of 30.6%—more than double the state poverty rate—and a child poverty rate of 48%—the third highest in the nation.
Ruby has no car and often struggles to get a ride downtown to work. She sometimes has to ask one of her kids for a ride, but she says she hates to ask them for help because they’re struggling too. 3 out of Ruby’s 4 grown children work as janitors in Cincinnati—just like their mom. 
In 2007, Cincinnati janitors organized a union to improve these jobs. It was a big step forward for low wage workers in the city, but today, Ruby and her coworkers are still fighting to make these better jobs.
“I don’t want my kids to struggle like I have, but unless we improve these jobs, our kids and grandkids will suffer too,” Ruby says. “Whether it’s janitorial jobs or fast food—these are the jobs our kids and grandkids are going to be doing.”

http://justice4janitors.tumblr.com/ is a follow-worthy blog doing important work for the janitors of Ohio. This is from the description on their page:

Columbus and Cincinnati janitors clean the headquarters of some of the biggest and most profitable corporations in the country. Despite their hard work, full-time janitors in Cincinnati and Columbus are on average paid less than $18,200 a year—below the poverty level and not nearly enough to support a family. They are now trying to negotiate new contracts with the cleaning contractors who employ them. Will you join them to take a stand for living wages and benefits?
Sign the Columbus petition
Sign the Cincinnati petition

thepeoplesrecord:

justice4janitors:

Ruby Bishop is a mother of 4 and a grandmother. She’s also a janitor at the Scripps building in downtown Cincinnati. Every night, Ruby cleans the offices of parents and grandparents whose lives are very different than hers.

As a single mom working low wage jobs, Ruby always had to rely on food stamps to feed herself and her children. While her kids were growing up, she often had to balance multiple jobs in order to keep a roof over their heads, and then barely had time to spend with them.

 “Every single day was a struggle,” Ruby says. “I get so sad when I see the young moms I work with trying to do it now, because I know exactly how hard it is.”

Ruby says she inherited her work ethic from her mom, who raised 15 children by herself in Kentucky.

“She taught me to respect people and to make it on my own,” Ruby says. “So that’s what I’ve done. I’ve made it on my own, but it’s been hard.”

Ruby lives with a friend in order to afford rent. She has no health insurance, so she doesn’t take the blood pressure medicine she needs. She just can’t afford it. About a year ago, Ruby had to have emergency dental surgery. Because she didn’t have insurance and couldn’t pay the full amount, the doctor sued her for the cost of the surgery. Now her wages are garnished every paycheck to pay off the medical bill.

“I don’t go to the doctor anymore,” Ruby says. “Not for anything.”

Thousands of Cincinnatians are in the same boat as Ruby. While the CEOs of our city’s Fortune 500 companies have helped themselves to higher salaries and bigger bonuses, poverty and segregation in our city have been rising steadily. Cincinnati currently has a poverty rate of 30.6%—more than double the state poverty rate—and a child poverty rate of 48%—the third highest in the nation.

Ruby has no car and often struggles to get a ride downtown to work. She sometimes has to ask one of her kids for a ride, but she says she hates to ask them for help because they’re struggling too. 3 out of Ruby’s 4 grown children work as janitors in Cincinnati—just like their mom.

In 2007, Cincinnati janitors organized a union to improve these jobs. It was a big step forward for low wage workers in the city, but today, Ruby and her coworkers are still fighting to make these better jobs.

“I don’t want my kids to struggle like I have, but unless we improve these jobs, our kids and grandkids will suffer too,” Ruby says. “Whether it’s janitorial jobs or fast food—these are the jobs our kids and grandkids are going to be doing.”

http://justice4janitors.tumblr.com/ is a follow-worthy blog doing important work for the janitors of Ohio. This is from the description on their page:

Columbus and Cincinnati janitors clean the headquarters of some of the biggest and most profitable corporations in the country. Despite their hard work, full-time janitors in Cincinnati and Columbus are on average paid less than $18,200 a year—below the poverty level and not nearly enough to support a family. They are now trying to negotiate new contracts with the cleaning contractors who employ them. Will you join them to take a stand for living wages and benefits?

Sign the Columbus petition

Sign the Cincinnati petition